Skip to content

HPV & Cervical Cancer

HPV – WHO GET’S IT?

  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) affects both females and males. HPV transmission can happen with any kind of genital contact with someone who has HPV—intercourse isn’t necessary.
  • Many people who have HPV don’t even know it, because the virus often has no signs or symptoms. That means you can get the virus or pass it on to your partner without knowing it.
  • In the United States, an estimated 75% to 80% of males and females will be infected with HPV in their lifetime. For most, the virus will clear on its own, but when it doesn’t, HPV can have consequences.
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) affects both females and males. HPV transmission can happen with any kind of genital contact with someone who has HPV—intercourse isn’t necessary.
  • Many people who have HPV don’t even know it, because the virus often has no signs or symptoms. That means you can get the virus or pass it on to your partner without knowing it.
  • In the United States, an estimated 75% to 80% of males and females will be infected with HPV in their lifetime. For most, the virus will clear on its own, but when it doesn’t, HPV can have consequences: In Women:  Precancers and cancers: cervical, vaginal, and vulvar.  In Men:  Genital Warts.
  • And there is no way to predict who will or won’t clear the virus.
  • There are about 6 million new cases of genital HPV* in the United States each year. It’s estimated that 74% of them occur in 15- to 24-year-olds.

*Number represents 30 to 40 genital HPV types, not just HPV Types 6, 11, 16, and 18.


PROTECTING AGAINST HPV AND THE DISEASES IT CAUSES

  • Having regular Pap tests is one of the best ways to help protect against cervical cancer in the future. A Pap test doesn’t diagnose HPV. But it can look for abnormal cells (that are caused by HPV) in the lining of the cervix before the cells become precancers or cancer.   All HPV types that affect the genital area can cause abnormal Pap tests. To determine if an abnormal Pap test is caused by HPV, your doctor can order an HPV test.
  • According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, a woman’s first Pap test should be at age 21. Be sure to follow your health care professional’s recommendation for cervical cancer screenings.
  • For girls who are not old enough for a Pap test, regular wellness visits are a good way to start lifelong, healthy habits.
  • While there is no way to screen men for HPV, there is a way for both men and women to help protect themselves from certain diseases caused by HPV.
  • Vaccination is another choice worth making. There is a vaccination available that helps protect against 4 types of HPV. In girls and young women ages 9 to 26, vaccination helps protect against 2 types of HPV that cause about 75% of cervical cancer cases, and 2 more types that cause 90% of genital warts cases. In boys and young men ages 9 to 26, vaccination helps protect against 90% of genital warts cases.
  • Vaccination also helps protect girls and young women ages 9-26 against 70% of vaginal cancer cases and up to 50% of vulvar cancer cases.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends routine vaccination for girls ages 11 to 12, and for young women ages 13 through 26 who have not already been vaccinated.  The CDC states that vaccination can be given to boys and young men ages 9 through 26, if you and the doctor decide it’s right for you son.

For more information on HPV, Cervical Cancer or HPV Vaccinations please visit the following sites:

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: